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“It Actually Works”

POSTED ON April 27, 2017   |   Post A Comment

I had the privilege of presenting six improvisation workshops at the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival in Moscow, Idaho in February. The Lewiston Tribune reported on my “How to Practice Creativity” workshop.

Jazz – it’s about learning to improvise

Musicians take part in workshop during Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival
By CHELSEA EMBREE of the Tribune  Feb 25, 2017

Tribune/Barry Kough
Saxophonist and educator Steve Treseler of Seattle (background, left) listens to students work on his ideas for improvising jazz during a workshop Friday at the Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival at the University of Idaho

MOSCOW – Drew Lyall knew he had to do something.

The 18-year-old from Kimberley, British Columbia, approached the piano at the front of the crowded room in the University of Idaho’s Teaching and Learning Center. He had been instructed to improvise a tune using only the piano’s A notes.

Lyall admitted later that there was “a bit of fear” involved, but he played anyway.

The experiment was part of a Lionel Hampton Jazz Festival workshop on practicing creativity Friday morning. Steve Treseler, a professional saxophonist and teacher at Seattle Pacific University, led the workshop, where he encouraged students to take creative risks and explore new ways of making music.

Lyall was grateful for the experience.

“I’m always keen to jump into a situation like that,” he said. “It’s just a little bit more experience of being in a situation that you aren’t well prepared for. The more often you do that, then the better you are when you’re in situations like that that really matter.”

Treseler focused on three creative practices Friday morning – experimentation, play and limitations.

Artists experiment in much the same way as scientists, learning as much from hypotheses that prove false as those that prove true, Treseler said.

“This might not work, but I’m going to try it anyway,” he said. “Having that kind of mindset is huge.”

Play, he said, refers to a childlike perspective of the task at hand. The goal is not to improve or to be the best.

“The goal of play is to just keep playing,” Treseler said.

Though counterintuitive, Treseler said limitations can inspire creativity. He passed out “creativity menus” to the musician-packed audience, including limitations like Lyall’s to play only one note.

There was one trio that was ready for the challenge. Trombonist Jay Panchal, 16, saxophonist Peter Lee, 16, and drummer Nivedan Kaushal, 17, came forward and promptly put themselves at the mercy of the crowd to pick two limitations from the menu.

The audience implored them to play in constant vibrato and in an 11/4 time meter.

Panchal told Kaushal that they could keep up that tempo if Kaushal could – and the trio from Nanaimo, British Columbia, played.

“That puts you out of your comfort zone,” Treseler said as they finished. “… This is the right kind of experimental mindset.”

Kaushal told the audience he had to “really focus” as he drummed. Afterward, he added that it was “cool” to be able to try anything he wanted.

“It’s one of the fears to get over, actually, just getting up front,” Kaushal said. “Let’s be honest – you’re never going to see anyone here again. Why not completely mess up if it means learning something?”

The trio was most excited, though, when pianist Lyall joined them for another improvisation game. The newly formed quartet played their music in a call-and-response format, with each instrument using only three pitches.

“I really enjoy playing with people I’ve never played with before,” Panchal said. “… Being thrown up there and seeing what happens when you mix different groups together was so cool.”

“The cool thing is it actually works,” Lee added. “It just works out.”

Embree may be contacted at email hidden; JavaScript is required or (208) 669-1298. Follow her on Twitter @chelseaembree.

© Copyright 2017 Lewiston Morning Tribune, TPC Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

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